"Architectural" Drawings

Lost in Translation

Digital Sample

Digital Sample

"Printed" Sample

"Printed" Sample

10,000 years from today, no matter how thoughtfully and articulately a design is implemented there will be something lost in translation. Physical structures may stand the test of time, but written language, designers’ intentions, and cultural understandings will not. The Greek word "myrioi" for 10,000 is the source of "myrietes" and "myrieteris," which mean "a period of 10,000 years. The word myrieteris looks a lot like mysteries, there was no algorithm applied to get to that conclusion, just an intentional misreading of the word. 

Forms on the other hand will still stand the test of time, the meaning and intention behind the forms may not, but the forms themselves will. Look at Stonehenge, the Pyramids of Giza, or the ruins of the Inca Empire. These are forms that insight great debate on the meaning and intentions of the people who built them. They are considered mysterious and often dangerous or dark. Film does this too, in 2001: Space Odyssey the use of the monolith, a prismatic structure, creates intrigue and doom, resulting in great debate over the actual meaning of the object.

For this project I am taking the idea of misreadings from one digital program into another. How does one program read the purpose of a line compared to another. I am looking at how this physically manifests itself into a printed form. One is printed completely “digitally” another is printed using a hybrid of physical and mechanical processes, using a digital fabrication device (i.e. attaching a felt tip pen in place of a knife of a vinyl cutter).  I am exploring the translation from one source to another and then from one medium to another and how those translations are slight variations of the original, becoming something mutated in the end, like a game of telephone.

 

Misreadings

 

The drawing style blends mechanical and physical tools and processes. The use of a vinyl cutter rigged with a jig to hold a felt tip pen gives the final resulting drawing. The idea that mechanical practices and tools were flawed compared to digital techniques is something I am exploring through these drawings. Are the challenges a hand draftsman face the same as a machine when they are using the same tool, i.e. the felt-tip pen? 

These drawings will use the notion of the square and the cube to create opportunities for potential misreadings. With no ground defined in the drawings it could appear that the squares are floating in the air and and casting a long shadow or it could be perceived as a form that is either protruding into the ground or into space.  

 
 
Digital A

Digital A

"Printed" A

"Printed" A

Digital B

Digital B

"Printed" B

"Printed" B


Final "Renderings"

 

Medium Exploration

 

Digital Output